Review: Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves #1) – Mary E. Pearson

Dance of Thieves_FINAL 9.18Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves #1) by Mary E. Pearson

Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (August 7, 2018)

Print Length: 508 pages

Audiobook Length: 16 hrs and 27 mins

Narrator: Karissa Vacker, James Patrick Cronin, Ann Marie Lee

When the patriarch of the Ballenger empire dies, his son, Jase, becomes its new leader. Even nearby kingdoms bow to the strength of this outlaw family, who have always governed by their own rules. But a new era looms on the horizon, set in motion by a young queen, which makes her the target of the dynasty’s resentment and anger.

At the same time, Kazi, a legendary former street thief, is sent by the queen to investigate transgressions against the new settlements. When Kazi arrives in the forbidding land of the Ballengers, she learns that there is more to Jase than she thought. As unexpected events spiral out of their control, bringing them intimately together, they continue to play a cat and mouse game of false moves and motives in order to fulfill their own secret missions.

The Review

Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves #1) is a YA fantasy novel that tells the story of Jase, the leader of a crime family, and Kazi, a reformed thief and member of the the Queen’s guard, as they learn to work together to save their ways of life, despite their obvious differences.

To revisit a world that you’ve become invested in, especially one as breathtaking as Terravin, is quite daunting. There are those fears that it won’t be the same, or honour the previously installments, but if this is a fear of yours you don’t have to worry. As with ‘The Remnant Chronicles,’ Pearson made Venda come alive, and while there is no hint of magic, I can honestly say it didn’t lessen the plot of this novel for me.

Before we get into the romance, which we all know Pearson does well, lets first talk about the individual players. Kazi was my favourite out of the newly introduced characters. Though he upbringing was hard, given that she was orphaned and made to fight for her own survival at a young age, she reformed from a life of crime to become a part of Queen Lia’s personal guard. She’ steadfast and strong, and the friendships she has with Wren and Synové is an example of girl power at its best. Speaking of Wren and Synové, the two other members of the guard, these girls were sassy and a whole lot of fun to read about. Each of the three had their strengths and used them to play on the others weaknesses, making them the perfect fighting trio. On the flip side, Jase is the rough and tumble boy and the head of the Patrei. While he is initially portrayed as a criminal, it is revealed that Jase would do anything for his family, and those who he governs, and isn’t afraid to do this by any means necessary.

Now, its time for the romance. I am absolute trash for the enemies to lovers trope, and let me tell you, Kazi and Jase definitely start off on the wrong foot. Reading the passes where they are chained together, lost in the desert, I laughed out loud on more than one occasion. While some may argue that the romance flips from hate to love rather quickly, I would argue that they spend a majority of the novel learning to trust one another, building a strong foundation for an actual relationship that I hope continues in book two, Vow of Thieves, slated for release on August 6, 2019.

Overall Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars.

Purchase Links

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indigo

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And those are my thoughts on Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves #1) by Mary E. Pearson. Have any YA fantasy recommendations you think I should check out? Leave them as a comment below and help my TBR grow.

 

 

 

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